the art

monogotari: a few minutes / with keith yurdana

 

n   you gotta recognize paradise! 

so, we here have a string of words: living with art, that very much guides our way of thinking when it comes to design. what are your thoughts when it comes to living with art?

 

n   i like that you mentioned how this group of work was a test for yourself to do something more whimsical (than the usual). 

 

k   in general, my work tends to be heavy, conceptual. its been called heavy and serious, almost grotesque. i used to reside in california and the northwest. but as of late, being in hawaii, color and light finds its way into my work and i just can’t get enough of the clouds. 

 

n   you gotta recognize paradise! 

so, we here have a string of words: living with art, that very much guides our way of thinking when it comes to design. what are your thoughts when it comes to living with art?

 

k   thats a great and odd question. first thought that comes to mind is the native american language where there really is no word for art. it just is, it’s ingrained in everything they do. i believe people are instinctively and constantly creative and find their own ways to tinker, think through life's changes. my work has to do with growth. when i can create something that speaks to a viewer i think ultimately- its nourishing.

keith yurdana: cloud machine 3, 4, 5
keith yurdana: cloud machine 3, 4, 5

 

keith yurdana: cloud machine 5

 

above are two works from gilles and louda larrain's series: dark angels.

gilles & louda larrain: la radeau dela medusa
                                        gilles & louda larrain: queen wanatabula

gilles larrain went from architecture to painting, to sculpture, to crafting culture and icons in new york city during the 60s.  larrain shares his series titled dark angels, an ongoing project with seeds in childhood memories slowly transformed.

ann asakura is the co-founder and executive director of TEMARI, center for asian and pacific arts, a 36-year old organization dedicated to perpetuating asian-pacific folk arts and their contemporary expressions. in monogatari, asakura explores the japanese concept of sonomama with her quilt sewn from re-purposed kimono textiles.
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